Another Chance to See…

The production company who made My Grandparents’ War have been in touch to say that the Mark Rylance episode is being shown again on Saturday 4 April at 7pm on Channel 4. I know you won’t be going out, so why not watch the show?! It gives a real insight into the role of the battle of Hong Kong in World War II and looks at the conditions of the PoWs from all angles.

Far East PoWs behind bars

In other news, Unbound are promoting ALL of their e-books to give people a good value read to fill the ‘staycation’ hours. Mine is on offer at £5 if you would like a copy of the digital edition. Check out the other great titles on there while you are at it – I have read several Unbound books now and they are a diverse bunch of interesting ideas: fiction, non-fiction, graphic books, all sorts. If you would like a copy of the paperback of Stranger In My Heart, I have a stash at home that I can send you, for £12 each including post and packing. Signed by the author, naturally. Contact me via the website.

It is well worth reading these stories from the Second World War at this strange time. Whenever I start feeling cooped up and grumpy at the restrictions on my lifestyle, I just think of the lot of the PoW. No food, no medicines, no entertainment, no work, no prospect of release, every chance of dying in captivity. Their fortitude is humbling and a lesson to us all.

Escape!

I have seen that in any great undertaking it is not enough for a man to depend simply upon himself.

Teton Sioux

On the night of 1st February 1942 Dad escaped from Sham Shui Po camp in Hong Kong and set off towards an uncertain future in China. He might have felt that he was taking back control of his destiny and in some senses he was. But he was heavily dependent on having companions for support and points of safety, resupply, information, healthcare, transport and finance along the way. He was escaping into an allied country, supported by British and American military missions. For all that, he and his companions were still destitute refugees who had to successfully navigate territory occupied by enemy troops, who would certainly have killed them if they had been discovered.

Interconnected and interdependent

The choice to escape must balance the possible hazards along the way with the likelihood of reaching the desired outcome. And what might be the cost of staying put? We know that many of Dad’s colleagues who remained in the camp had a miserable time and some did not survive. The worst outcome of both choices was death, but the best outcome of escape was freedom and agency.

The diminished, demoralised and degraded group of men who remained in the PoW camp were to become Dad’s mission when he was appointed Assistant Military Attaché in Chongqing. Their appalling treatment in camp meant that they were no longer fit to escape – it would have to be mass liberation. Sadly, the fate of Hong Kong PoWs was not a strategic priority and Dad’s rescue plan – although agreed at the most senior levels as part of a bold strategy to win the Pacific War – was not actioned. An arrogant personality clash among the military leadership led to a different strategy, the consequent suffering of many and the loss of millions of lives.

Moving Pictures

Moving pictures of both kinds to discuss. I met a TV company in London who are making a series to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of WW2, to be aired in the autumn on C4. They asked me all about the Battle of Hong Kong and the FEPoW experience at Sham Shui Po camp, as well as Dad’s escape. The celebrity who is presenting this episode is being flown out to Hong Kong – without me! – and the company may or may not want to interview me to fill in the gaps. They like that I am female in a male dominated topic, but I guess it depends how the filming goes in HK.

I have just returned from Shropshire where my brother showed me some old family photos. I took them to the nursing home to show my mum, Betty, and she really connected with them. It prompted her to tell some stories from her youth and it was so moving to see her enjoy her memories and to hold a coherent thread. It is rare treat nowadays to see her rise from a sea of confusion for a brief moment in the light of reason. I told her I loved her, always mindful that it may be the last time that I can be confident that the message will reach its destination.

These portraits of my parents are by society photographer, Madame Yevonde of Berkeley Square.

John Monro 1952
John Monro 1952
EL Monro 1952
Betty Monro 1952, aged 25

There was also a couple of pictures of Dora; with her brother Howard on a cruise to Australia in the 1970s, perhaps after husband John died in 1975? And with John in the 1930s.

Dora Metcalf cruise
Dora Metcalf, Frances & Howard Greene, 1970s?
John & Dora Metcalf
Capt John & Dora Metcalf

Silver Lining

IMG_1155

The snowday was a bother. We intended to go to Leeds, for my book talk, via Chester to visit my cousin and then via elderly friends in Yorkshire. I was feeling overwhelmed by impending deadlines so we dropped the Chester visit. Then Julian got a cold and it didn’t seem fair to inflict that on the elderly friends and then it began to snow. I booked a train to Leeds but on Sunday morning it was snowing heavily and the Cross Country Trains website warned of severe delays and cancellations, so I decided to stay home. Luckily I had recorded my 15 minute presentation and sent it to the FEPOW History team so that they could at least play that. I was very sad to miss the opportunity to meet them all though.

So, I had Saturday to Tuesday free to prepare my lecture on vascular changes at birth and to read the proofs for Stranger In My Heart. Phew! The proofs are my final chance to make any changes and correct any errors and it was essential to read all 75,000 words very carefully. It’s done and returned to the editorial department, along with all the permissions from other publishers allowing me to quote copyrighted works in my book. For my lecture I have to do a lot of research and it takes time to find relevant papers, read and understand them and then convert them into a clinically relevant presentation. I’m not there yet but I have made a good start. Best of all, it feels like the pressure is off a bit.

In other news, I’ve seen some draft designs for my book cover, but we’re not quite finalised yet. I’m also busy planning a party to celebrate the launch of the book. Exciting times!